In Further Praise of Poetry: The Sonnet

Last week I sang the praises of poetry in general. This week, I’m focusing on the sonnet, possibly my favorite piece of formal verse. Down through the generations, poets have enjoyed stretching and occasionally twisting the rules of this intricately rhymed, tightly structured form, but a whole world of emotion and experience can be packed into those fourteen lines. Here are three sonnets, by three different poets, from three different eras–all of them distinctive, each of them impossible to forget.

468px-Shakespeare

Sonnet 130

My mistress’ eyes are nothing like the sun;
Coral is far more red than her lips’ red;
If snow be white, why then her breasts are dun;
If hairs be wires, black wires grow on her head.
I have seen roses damasked, red and white,
But no such roses see I in her cheeks;
And in some perfumes is there more delight
Than in the breath that from my mistress reeks.
I love to hear her speak, yet well I know
That music hath a far more pleasing sound;
I grant I never saw a goddess go;
My mistress when she walks treads on the ground.
     And yet, by heaven, I think my love as rare
     As any she belied with false compare.

–William Shakespeare (1564-1616)

Ω

William_Butler_Yeats_by_John_Butler_Yeats_1900

Leda and the Swan

 A sudden blow: the great wings beating still
    Above the staggering girl, her thighs caressed
    By the dark webs, her nape caught in his bill,
    He holds her helpless breast upon his breast.

    How can those terrified vague fingers push
    The feathered glory from her loosening thighs?
    And how can body, laid in that white rush,
    But feel the strange heart beating where it lies?

    A shudder in the loins engenders there
    The broken wall, the burning roof and tower,
    And Agamemnon dead.

                        Being so caught up,

    So mastered by the brute blood of the air,
    Did she put on his knowledge with his power
    Before the indifferent beak could let her drop?

–William Butler Yeats (1865-1939)

Ω

347px-E._E._Cummings_NYWTS

“next to of course god america i
love you land of the pilgrims’ and so forth oh
say can you see by the dawn’s early my
country ’tis of centuries come and go
and are no more what of it we should worry
in every language even deafanddumb
thy sons acclaim your glorious name by gorry
by jingo by gee by gosh by gum
why talk of beauty what could be more beaut-
iful than these heroic happy dead
who rushed like lions to the roaring slaughter
they did not stop to think they died instead
then shall the voice of liberty be mute?”

He spoke.  And drank rapidly a glass of water.

–e.e. cummings (1894-1962)

Do you have a favorite sonnet? Or a poet who writes sonnets that you admire?

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